_

Martellata_14.09. 1991 is part of a genealogy of works dedicated to institutional critique. The goal of this project, following Carrie Noland[1] –which holds that the cultural inscription encourages individuals to modify cultural practices– is to expand the tradition of institutional critique to research the ways in which culture is at the same time incarnated and challenged.

The project will also be a contribution to the theory of response to art, and in particular, to the vandalism and iconoclasm in line with the two main authors: David Freedberg and Dario Gamboni and their publications The Power of Images. Studies in the History and Theory of Response (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991) and The Destruction of Art: Iconoclasm and Vandalism since the French Revolution (London: Reaktion Books, 1997).

In relation to this last publication, Martellata_14.09.91 aims to correct the errors collected regarding Cannata’s vandalistic act while providing a thorough and detailed analysis of the event. Dario Gamboni, writes on page 271 of its Spanish edition (2014) that “Piero Cannata used a hammer on September 14, 1991 to break the tips of all the toes of David” and that “he was envious of Miguel Angel”.

As for the context of contemporary art, Martellata_14.09.91 also has de intention of bringing a new contribution within the growing field of vandalism that was inaugurated by Bruno Latour with Iconoclash, Karlsruhe, 2002 and that currently concludes in Venice Biennale the Catalan pavilion To lose your head (Idols), 2019. Providing an approach in line with the new materialisms and while generating chrono-material dialogues, the project aims to be a counter-point in relation to exhibitions that had a more literal focus as Art under Attack: Histories of British Iconoclasm, Tate Britain, 2013-2014; Gestos iconoclastes, imatges heterodoxes (Iconoclast gestures, heterodox images) at CaixaFòrum of Barcelona, 2016; and the monograph of Francesc Torres La capsa entròpica [El museu d’objectes perduts] (The entropic box [The Museum of Lost Objects]), MNAC, 2017-2018.

pagina-271_web

GAMBONI, Dario. The destruction of art. Iconoclasm and vandalism since the French Revolution. Spanish version Madrid: Cátedra, 2014. Reproduction of page 271 where the destructive gesture of Piero Cannata is wrongly described

 

pagina-272_web
GAMBONI, Dario. The destruction of art. Iconoclasm and vandalism since the French Revolution. Spanish version Madrid: Cátedra, 2014. Reproduction of page 272 where Piero Cannata’s motivations for hammering Davids toe is wrongly described

[1] NOLAND, Carrie. Agency and Embodiment. Performing Gestures/Producing Culture. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2009.